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Vol 3: Genre Fiction

Vol 4: Writing, Editing and
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Vol 5: Non-Fiction, Poetry
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Vol 6: Erotica

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

screenplays

 

87 Screenplay-Related Ideas for Writers

87 very clever ideas that will enable you to write unique, compelling and successful screenplays faster and easier than ever before.

36 pages, ebook (PDF), £3.99

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Why you need this book

In today's ultra-competitive writing and publishing market, you need every advantage you can get. That's where our inspiring collection of writing ideas can help you.

Each of the 35 books in the ideas4writers collection is packed with versatile ideas, expert tips, and easy-to-implement practical advice.

You'll soon be writing brilliant books, amazing articles, and standout stories that will have readers, editors and publishers longing for more.

The SCREENPLAYS collection includes:

  • An easy way to get started
  • How to format your script correctly
  • How to find production companies
  • How to choose the perfect title
  • Understanding Hollywood industry standards
  • The 5 essential books you *must* read - Hollywood insists on it!
  • How to adapt a novel into a screenplay
  • How to squeeze in more action
  • How to add more pace
  • How to add emotional impact
  • Getting the action-dialogue balance right
  • Understanding movie budgets
  • All about optioning
  • All about concepts
  • All about running times
  • Speculative scripts and test scripts - and why you should write one
  • 2 clever tricks you can learn from Hollywood
  • 6 ways of adding more layers to your screenplay
  • How to make your own video
  • How to load your screenplay with great ideas
  • How to predict what audiences will be watching in the future
  • 3 ways to reveal a character's thoughts on screen
  • Easy ways to produce your own storyboard
  • How to identify a movie's turning point
  • How to make sure your script isn't too predictable
  • How to write a movie script in real time
  • How to write a TV series or soap opera
  • Plus 8 movie scenes that *always* work
  • And much more - far too many great ideas to list here!

Be a more inspired, more productive and more successful writer with the ideas4writers ideas collection.

Excerpt: Sub-plots versus main plots

A story that would be too weak to work on its own can sometimes make a great sub-plot. Here's a story you might like to use. A girl has been set a homework problem by her maths teacher. She can't do it, so she asks her father to help. He can't do it either, and he starts asking other people to help. Eventually he finds a maths professor who agrees that it's a particularly difficult question. He agrees to work on it and call back when he has an answer. Eventually he does, and the girl and her father go to see him. He has to talk them through the answer a number of times because it's so complicated. Eventually the girl understands it and commits it to memory. She puts the answer in her schoolbook, complete with all the working out. But it turns out that there was an error on the homework sheet her teacher gave her, and the real question was quite simple. You might like to consider rewarding the girl and her father in some way.

That's a great short story, but it probably wouldn't work on its own as a movie. So let's turn it into a sub-plot. We need a bigger story for the main plot. Let's say that the girl's father is a master criminal. We can show him plotting to steal priceless jewels, committing the crime, getting involved in police chases and so on. And all the while he's churning over the maths problem and looking for someone who might know how to work it out. We see two very different sides to him.

Or how about if his daughter has an illness or disability and he's stealing the jewels to raise money for her treatment? The sub-plot shows how much he really cares about her. He isn't the one-dimensional hardened criminal that he first appears to be.

Next time you come up with an idea for a story, think about whether it would work as a main plot or a sub-plot. If it's a sub-plot, you can, as we've just seen, easily construct a main plot around it. The main plot contains all the action but the sub-plot contains (or supports) the movie's real theme, and adds an extra dimension to the characters.

Extra value!

Buy the complete Volume 2 (General Fiction - 6 books in 1)

Includes: Fiction, Novels, Plays, Screenplays,
Short Stories, Storylines

1,100 very clever ideas, 408 pages

only £24.99 (save £9.95)

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